Review – Nevernight by Jay Kristoff

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Nevernight (Book 1 in Nevernight Chronicle)
Jay Kristoff
Publish date: August 9th


Synopsis

The first in a new fantasy series from the New York Times bestselling author.

In a land where three suns almost never set, a fledgling killer joins a school of assassins, seeking vengeance against the powers who destroyed her family.

Daughter of an executed traitor, Mia Corvere is barely able to escape her father’s failed rebellion with her life. Alone and friendless, she hides in a city built from the bones of a dead god, hunted by the Senate and her father’s former comrades. But her gift for speaking with the shadows leads her to the door of a retired killer, and a future she never imagined.

Now, Mia is apprenticed to the deadliest flock of assassins in the entire Republic—the Red Church. If she bests her fellow students in contests of steel, poison and the subtle arts, she’ll be inducted among the Blades of the Lady of Blessed Murder, and one step closer to the vengeance she desires. But a killer is loose within the Church’s halls, the bloody secrets of Mia’s past return to haunt her, and a plot to bring down the entire congregation is unfolding in the shadows she so loves.

Will she even survive to initiation, let alone have her revenge?


My Review

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Goodness, where to even begin with this book? I guess I’ll start by saying…

WOW!

Wow, this book was amazing. Really, really amazing. As a fan of Kristoff’s other work, Illuminae, I was fairly sure I’d like Nevernight. But since Illuminae was co-authored with a female author (Amie Kaufman), and since I rarely read books written by men (other than Jim Butcher), I did still have my doubts. But Jay Kristoff has once again proven himself to be a master at storytelling and world building. He is undoubtedly a fantasy and sci-fi powerhouse, and this rising author is one to keep our eyes on. On an unrelated note, he’s also quite pretty, so that isn’t exactly a burden, now is it?

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Now, this book is marketed as “young adult,” but other than the fact that many characters are young adults, I truly did not get much of a “young adult” feel from this story. It is dark. Seriously, seriously dark.  I’m talking, brutal, violent, and very explicit language and sexual content. Very, very explicit. And I finished this book in one sitting because it.was.amazing!

The first couple chapters are strange, so it takes a couple minutes to get into the story. The introduction is really cool though, I don’t know how to explain it, but its really cool. This is definitely not a light and easy read. The story telling is very complex, with multiple flashbacks (which are not labeled, so you have to stay on your feet to keep track of when in the story you are). It all connects to creating this really rich, really well developed and complex world and plot. I do have to say that it took a bit for me to get hooked, because the world is so complicated and detailed, but once I did, I could not put it down. The main character is determined to become an assassin so as to reap revenge on those who wronged her and her family, but first she has to find the den of the Assassins. And that is a challenge in and of itself. Once she finds it, she starts training. At that point its sort of like Hogwarts or Dauntless, except way more brutal and violent. Throw in friends, enemies, frenemies, mysterious instructors, dangerous challenges, and 30 people fighting for just 4 coveted “assassin spots,” and you are in for a wild, dark, and dangerous ride.

Fans of Sarah J. Maas’ Throne of Glass, Veronica Roth’s Divergent, and Tamora Pierce’s work are going to go crazy for this new series by Jay Kristoff. Anyone who has enjoyed Kristoff’s other works are sure to love this as well. And fans of dark fantasy with incredibly vivid world building will snap this right up. Plus, its about a kick-butt female assassin in training. So who isn’t going to like it?

Run, don’t walk, to pick up your copy of Nevernight on August 9th. You seriously have got to read this book.

(YA Review) The Storyspinner by Becky Wallace

Screen Shot 2015-11-17 at 10.25.12 AMThe Storyspinner
Author: Becky Wallace
Published: March 3, 2015
Genre: Fantasy, YA, Romance
Rating: 3.75
Why’d I read it?:
According to the synopsis, this book has all of the elements I like; fantasy, action, multiple perspectives, with a dash of romance.
Wallace, Becky. The Storyspinner. Margaret K. McElderry. 2015. Print.


Synopsis: (from goodreads)

Drama and danger abound in this fantasy realm where dukes play a game for the throne, magical warriors race to find the missing heir, and romance blossoms where it is least expected.

In a world where dukes plot their way to the throne, a Performer’s life can get tricky. And in Johanna Von Arlo’s case, it can be fatal. Expelled from her troupe after her father’s death, Johanna is forced to work for the handsome Lord Rafael DeSilva. Too bad they don’t get along. But while Johanna’s father’s death was deemed an accident, the Keepers aren’t so sure.

The Keepers, a race of people with magical abilities, are on a quest to find the princess—the same princess who is supposed to be dead and whose throne the dukes are fighting over. But they aren’t the only ones looking for her. And in the wake of their search, murdered girls keep turning up—girls who look exactly like the princess, and exactly like Johanna.

With dukes, Keepers, and a killer all after the princess, Johanna finds herself caught up in political machinations for the throne, threats on her life, and an unexpected romance that could change everything


My Thoughts:

I chose this book because it sounded like it would have all of the elements I enjoy in a book; fantasy, action, multiple perspectives, romance, etc. And it did. For some reason I just never quite clicked with the story the way I usually do, but I have to be fair and say that at the time I was reading this I had a lot of family and personal troubles occurring as well, and I’m afraid it significantly affected my state of mind while reading the book. It’s highly possible that at another time I would have clicked with this story more, because as I said, it truly has all the elements I enjoy in a book.

Nevertheless the premise of the story is quite original, and I LOVE the beginning(ish) scene. The way the two main characters meet is hysterical, and is quite unlike the usual way. It really demonstrates major aspects of both of their personalities, as well. Its a great “meet cute.” The cast of characters gets pretty extensive, and basically the story follows two different groups of people. Throughout the story its unclear right away how the two groups’ stories will intersect, but eventually that becomes more clear. So overall I’d say that if you enjoy fantasy stories such as this, you may want to give The Storyspinner a try.

 


Extras:

 


Liked it? Loved it? Gotta have more of it?
You might also enjoy:

(YA Review) What We Saw by Aaron Hartzler

Screen Shot 2015-11-16 at 8.28.19 PMWhat We Saw
Author: Aaron Hartzler
Published: Sept. 22, 2015
Genre: Realistic Fiction
Themes: Peer Pressure, Drugs, Alcohol, Sex, Rape
Rating: 5 stars
Why’d I read it?:
This book covers a topic that is so important, which is our societies’ tendency towards victim-shaming, blaming the victim, and generally the appalling “rape culture” we live within.
Hartzler, Aaron. What We Saw. HarperTeen. 2015. Print. ISBN-13: 978-0062338747.
Formats available: paperback, ebook, hardcover Paperback $6.87. Kindle $10.99


Synopsis: (from amazon)

Critically acclaimed memoirist Aaron Hartzler, author of Rapture Practice, takes an unflinching look at what happens to a small town when some of its residents commit a terrible crime. This honest, authentic debut novel—inspired by the events in the Steubenville rape case—will resonate with readers who’ve ever walked that razor-thin line between guilt and innocence that so often gets blurred, one hundred and forty characters at a time.

The party at John Doone’s last Saturday night is a bit of a blur. Kate Weston can piece together most of the details: Stacey Stallard handing her shots, Ben Cody taking her keys and getting her home early. . . . But when a picture of Stacey passed out over Deacon Mills’s shoulder appears online the next morning, Kate suspects she doesn’t have all the details. When Stacey levels charges against four of Kate’s classmates, the whole town erupts into controversy. Facts that can’t be ignored begin to surface, and every answer Kate finds leads back to the same questions: Who witnessed what happened to Stacey? And what responsibility do they have to speak up about what they saw?


My Thoughts:

This is such an important story to be told because it sparks discussion on a topic which is often swept under the rug and ignored. Rape Culture in the U.S. is a serious problem. Victim-shaming and victim-blaming are tendencies which run rampant in our society. This story is inspired by the true story of the Steubenville rape case 0f 2012 and also of other similar cases to arise lately. Teens throw a party in which there is a lot of drinking and drugs. One girl drinks so much she becomes unconscious and the next day accuses several members of the school’s basketball team of sexually assaulting her while unconscious. The story deals with concepts of truth and lies, perception, betrayal and trust. It also deals strongly with the idea of opening your eyes and seeing beyond the pressures of our community, and also of how to do what’s right once you’ve seen the truth. It can be very hard to see the truth, and to speak up when all of your friends and even your entire town seem to be willing you towards blindness and silence.

This book was quite excellent in the way it broaches such serious topics, and while it in no way flinches from the true horror of these kinds of events (gang-rape of an unconscious girl is discussed), the author keeps the story from being so graphic as to be distracting from the true issues of right and wrong. I highly recommend this to readers of all ages and gender, and I challenge you to consider what you would do in such a situation. Being human means doing more than spectating; it means we must act to create the world we wish to live in.

 

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Extras:

** On a personal note: 

  • Unfortunately we live in a time where sexual assault is increasingly common, especially against women.
  • Most often, the person assaulting you is someone you know. You may be friends or even love this person. Even if its a friend or loved one, sexual assault is wrong.
    • If you said “no,” then it is wrong.
    • If you were incapable of saying yes or no, it was wrong.
    • If you were drunk, high, asleep, or even wearing “provocative clothes,” sexual assault is still wrong!
    • Every one has the right to wear, do, say, and act exactly the way they want without fear of assault.
    • Please don’t let anyone convince you that this was your fault. It is never your fault when you are assaulted.
  • Please be sure to see a medical specialist and speak with a trusted adult if you think you may have been assaulted.

Liked it? Loved it? Gotta have more of it?
You might also enjoy:

Delirium by Lauren Oliver

Delirium

Oliver, Lauren. Delirium. New York: Harper, 2011. Print. ISBN-13: 9780061726828 Formats available: hardcover, paperback, ebook, audiobook. Paperback $5.72. Kindle $4.99.

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Synopsis:

It’s the future and love (and other strong emotions) have been deemed a “disease.” And they have a cure. Everyone gets “cured” when they are 18. Lena is just a couple months away and she cannot wait. She watched love destroy her family, and she doesn’t want anything to do with it. But then she meets Alex. He has no interest in being “cured” and he might just show Lena that theres more to life (and love) than she ever thought possible.


Themes include: Love, fear, deceit, grief, betrayal, friendship, identity, coming of age.


My Thoughts: Delirium has that Dystopian setting that many of us are loving. I had a hard time getting over the idea that “love is a disease” and that futuristic society would eradicate it. Perhaps if it had been all emotions, not just love, I would have found it more believable. However, once I put that aside I did indeed enjoy this book as well as its sequel Pandemonium. Lena is a relatable character, she’s trying to do what she thinks is right but finding it increasingly difficult as she learns more about Alex, and the other invalids (people who have not been “cured”). The romance is sweet and heartbreaking and the story is heavily influenced by Romeo and Juliet. Who doesn’t like seeing if two star-crossed lovers can overcome circumstances to find a happily-ever-after?


Liked it? Loved it? Gotta have more of it?
The next book in the Delirium Trilogy is Pandemonium


Extras:

  • Locate Delirium at your local library through Worldcat.org
  • Learn more about the Delirium world on its Wiki
  • If you liked Delirium, you might find something else you like on Goodreads.com

About the Author: Lauren Oliver is the author of the Delirium trilogy, as well as other YA books.


Citation & Credits
Book cover image: Courtesy of Amazon.com
LaurenOliverUK. “Delirium by Lauren Oliver *Interactive Trailer*.” Online video clip. YouTube.com. 7 July 2011. Web. 25 July 2015.

(YA Review) The Selection – Kiera Cass

The Selection (trilogy) by Kiera Cass

Cass, Kiera. The Selection. , 2013. Print. : 9780062059949. Formats available: hardcover, paperback, e-book, and audiobook. Paperback $5.17. Kindle $4.99


Screen Shot 2015-07-31 at 2.41.55 PMSynopsis:

What’s your number?

In the future everyone is assigned a number, a level in the social and political hierarchy. You are live and die with the number your parents were, unless you can marry or buy your way up. Anything less than a 3 means a difficult, often dangerous, life. A 1 means you are royalty. America is a 5. And she’s secretly in love with a 6. But if she married down, her family might not be able to make it financially. Then comes the moment where America is invited to be a contestant in The Selection, where she will compete to win the heart of the prince. Being a contestant means a paycheck for as long as she lasts. So America applies. She didn’t expect to be chosen to compete. She didn’t expect to have feelings for the Prince. Which number, which life, and which love will America choose?


Booktalk: 


Themes include: Love, duty, sacrifice, love-triangle, financial struggles, reality shows, injustice, bias, caste systems. 


My Thoughts: This is one that I have a hard time reviewing. One the one hand, I was not thrilled with the stories and felt they lacked a distinct…something. On the other hand, I did binge read all three because I had to know how it ended. So despite not loving the stories, they were gripping enough that I had to finish them. So I would say The Selection series is enjoyable and entertaining, but does not compare in depth of character, world-building, or follow through to something like The Hunger Games. The premise is quite interesting, with the multitude of Reality Television today, and shows like The Bachelor, the concept is one we are familiar with. Being set in the future and among royalty gives it a modern and unique Cinderella-esque twist. Each of the characters were likeable enough, the settings were interesting, and the stories are great for a light, easy read. But I feel that the author missed a great many opportunities to give these books the true Dystopian depth they had the potential for. The society described is actually a pretty cool concept, but once America gets to the palace, the political and social implications of the outside world quickly fall away. Although the King is set up as a tyrant figure, we never really get to see him in action, or the devastation he causes close up. It appears that the author briefly dipped her toes into the concept of political tyranny, and the potential for social revolution, but quickly found the temperature not to her liking. It definitely feels as though she had intended to go deeper into this world, but in the end decided to pull back and give us a shallow Cinderella story. America herself comes across as silly, fickle, and immature. She too never seems to live up to her potential. However, not all novels need to go quite as deep as The Hunger Games, so I would not write The Selection off entirely. Its a great choice for a light, love-triangle based Cinderella story. It’s popularity demands that this series has a place in most libraries and many young adults will enjoy these reads.


Liked it? Loved it? Gotta have more of it?
The next books in the trilogy are The Elite, and The One. A fourth book, The Heir, takes place 20 years after the trilogy.

If you liked these ones, I’d also recommend:

  • Matched by Ally Condie (dystopian, love triangle, light read)
  • Pawn by Aimee Carter (dystopian, society divided into numbered caste system)
  • Whither by Lauren DeStefano (dystopian, love triangle, ‘prince’ character versus ‘commoner’ character)

Extras:

  • Warner Bros has optioned the rights to bring The Selection to the big screen!
  • Locate the Selection series at your local library through Worldcat.org
  • Learn more about the world and characters on The Selection Wiki
  • Toucan has a great interview with Kiera Cass. **Beware of Spoilers for books 2, and 3**

About the Author:  Kiera Cass is the author of The Selection Series, including several Selection Novellas.


Citation & Credits
Book cover image: Courtesy of Amazon.com
Book Talk: Kelsey Bogan. 2015. All rights reserved.

(Review-Ya) Mortal Heart by Robin Lafevers

Mortal Heart by Robin Lafevers

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LaFevers, Robin. Mortal Heart. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2014. Print. ISBN-13: 978-0547628400.
Formats available: hardcover, paperback, ebook, audiobook. Paperback $9.18. Kindle $9.99.

Synopsis: (from amazon.com)

In the powerful conclusion to Robin LaFever’s New York Times bestselling His Fair Assassins trilogy, Annith has watched her gifted sisters at the convent come and go, carrying out their dark dealings in the name of St. Mortain, patiently awaiting her own turn to serve Death. But her worst fears are realized when she discovers she is being groomed by the abbess as a Seeress, to be forever sequestered in the rock and stone womb of the convent. Feeling sorely betrayed, Annith decides to strike out on her own.
She has spent her whole life training to be an assassin. Just because the convent has changed its mind, doesn’t mean she has.

My Thoughts:
During the first two books in this series, I thought Annith was the least interesting character, so I was not overly eager to read her book. I wasn’t dreading it, just felt kind of “meh” about it. But I’m very glad I did, because even though my feelings about Annith haven’t changed very much, in this book we get to meet her male counterpart, Belthezar, who is by far the most compelling male character in the trilogy. Belthezar “rescues” Annith after she escapes the convent one night, and she suddenly finds herself traveling with him and his band of mysterious, not-quite-human brethren. They are the Helloquins, damned souls who ride the night, hunting down and escorting lost souls to the afterworld. Although the first two books in the trilogy read more as historical fiction, with only little hints at magic or fantasy, this book seems to randomly go off in a new direction, with the addition of this almost ghostly army of Helloquins, but I didn’t care so much because they were quite fascinating. Belthezar proves an enigmatic and mysterious character, and I enjoyed learning more about his past as the book unfolds. I never really warmed up to Annith, but the other characters (Belthezar, and the Duchess included) more than made up for it, and Mortal Heart proves a satisfying conclusion to the trilogy.


Liked it? Loved it? Gotta have more of it?
The other two books in the His Fair Assassin series are Dark Triumph and Mortal Heart

You might also like:

The Kiss of Deception (Remnant Series) by Mary Pearson
Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas


Extras:

  • Robin Lafevers’ website includes extras about the World of His Fair Assassin.
  • Locate Mortal Heart at a library near you on worldcat.com
  • Find more recommendations on goodreads.com

About the Author: 


Citation & Credits
Book cover image: Courtesy of Amazon.com
Kelsey Bogan. 2015. All rights reserved.

Pawn by Aimee Carter

Pawn by Aimee Carter

Carter, Aimee. Pawn. Don Mills, Ont: Harlequin Teen, 2013. Print. Formats available: hardcover, paperback, ebook, audiobook. Paperback $9.99. Kindle $4.99.

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Synopsis:

If you could trade everything you’ve ever known and loved for a better place in society, would you? After Kitty gets a measly 3 on her placement test, guaranteeing her a miserable, difficult, and dangerous life, she is offered this choice. She can take a dead girl’s place as a 7. All she needs to do is say goodbye to the world she’s known and the people she loves. Kitty makes the deal, only to find out it comes with serious strings attached. Now she’s thrown into an even more dangerous life than being a 3 would have been. Her new “family” is secretive, conniving, and murderous. And they expect her to stop the rebellion that her predecessor started.

Kitt is about to find herself no more than a pawn in their games.


Booktalk: 


Themes include: Betrayal, lies, privilege, consequences, choice, love, and sacrifice.


My Thoughts: Pawn has many similarities to the popular The Selection series by Kiera Cass, with the dystopian society with a numbered caste system. It also features something of a love triangle dynamic, when Kitty escapes life as a 3, leaving her boyfriend behind, and meets a new boy in her new life as a 7. There is also a Hunger Games feel to the story as Kitty is pressured into being a Pawn for those around her. The story never quite lives up to its potential, lacking the kind of emotional intensity and immediacy that other popular dystopian tales have managed, and while Kitty is a character we can all root for, the secondary characters never seem to be fully realized. There is plenty of intrigue and plot twists to keep the reader guessing at what will happen next, and with a few big shockers along the way, though, that many fans of the Dystopian genre will eagerly dive into the next installment in this series.


Liked it? Loved it? Gotta have more of it?
The next book in the The Blackcoat Rebellion is Captive.


Extras:


About the Author: Aimee Carter is the author of The Blackcoat Rebellion, as well as other books.


Citation & Credits
Book cover image: Courtesy of Amazon.com.
Book Talk: Kelsey Bogan. 2015. All rights reserved.
Harlequinn Books. “Pawn by Aimee Carter (Book Trailer).” Online video clip. YouTube.com. 25 Nov 2013. Web. 01 Aug 2015.

(Review-Ya) Dark Triumph by Robin Lafevers

Dark Triumph by Robin Lafevers

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LaFevers, Robin. Dark Triumph. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2013. Print. ISBN-13: 978-0544227200.
Formats available: hardcover, paperback, ebook, audiobook. Paperback $9.25. Kindle $7.49.

Synopsis: (from amazon.com)

Sybella’s duty as Death’s assassin in 15th-century France forces her return home to the personal hell that she had finally escaped. Love and romance, history and magic, vengeance and salvation converge in this thrilling sequel to Grave Mercy.
Sybella arrives at the convent’s doorstep half mad with grief and despair. Those that serve Death are only too happy to offer her refuge—but at a price. The convent views Sybella, naturally skilled in the arts of both death and seduction, as one of their most dangerous weapons. But those assassin’s skills are little comfort when the convent returns her to a life that nearly drove her mad. And while Sybella is a weapon of justice wrought by the god of Death himself, He must give her a reason to live. When she discovers an unexpected ally imprisoned in the dungeons, will a daughter of Death find something other than vengeance to live for?

My Thoughts:
This sequel to Grave Mercy picks up where it’s predecessor left off, this time chronicling the adventures of Sybil, the wild and erratic member of the Assassin’s trio. This book is quite a bit darker than Grave Mercy and deals with heavier themes of violence. There is also quite a bit less time spent on the romance, although there is a bit of romance for Sybil as well. I enjoyed this book, as part of the series, but were it only a standalone it would not fare well. A lot of the background knowledge is assumed, and if you have not read Grave Mercy you may be confused or miss out on some aspects of this story. It is a strong enough sequel to keep the momentum going, and its satisfying to have some of the mystery surrounding Sybil and her family explained. We also get to see the villain much more fully developed in this book, and it gets easier and easier to hate him the more you learn. Poor Sybil faces more challenges and abuse than either of her friends, and as a reader I couldn’t wait to get to the end to see if she would come out victorious. Fans of Grave Mercy will be glad to see snippets of what Ismae is up to, in this sequel, though the story focuses mainly on Sybil.


Liked it? Loved it? Gotta have more of it?
The next two books in the His Fair Assassin series are Grave Mercy and Mortal Heart

You might also like:

The Kiss of Deception (Remnant Series) by Mary Pearson
Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas


Extras:


About the Author: 


Citation & Credits
Book cover image: Courtesy of Amazon.com
Kelsey Bogan. 2015. All rights reserved.

(Review-YA) The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

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Stiefvater, Maggie. The Raven Boys. New York: Scholastic Press, 2012. Print. ISBN-13: 978-0545424929.
Formats available: hardcover, paperback, ebook, audiobook. Paperback $6.37. Kindle $4.99.

Synopsis:
Blue has always known (thanks to her clairvoyant family members) that she is cursed. Her curse says that her true love will die after she kisses him. So Blue has made it a point to stay away from boys, and from Raven Boys (wealthy private school boys), in particular. Since Raven Boys are arrogant and annoying, this has not been difficult. But Blue meets Gansey and his friends, all Raven Boys, and soon finds herself drawn into their Quest to find a mythological King, said to be buried somewhere near their town. Whoever finds this King is said to receive one wish. Now all of Blue’s plans are spinning out of control as she befriends, and begins to fall for, these Raven Boys.

My Thoughts:
I just discovered The Raven Boys this summer, and I loved it. I think I liked it even more because, based on the book flap description, I didn’t expect to like it. The description says that Blue has known her whole life that she is cursed so that if she kisses her true love, he will die. The description makes this story sound like a love story about Blue not being able to kiss the boy she loves, but it turns out to be much more a story of friendship among these five main characters. As they embark on their quest together, each of the five bonds with each other in different ways, and throughout the series we see the great love they all bear for each other. There are definitely themes of “bro-mance” as well as romance, and I quite liked seeing their loyalty and affection for each member of the group. I like that we are getting to know the characters so well, and there is no insta-love. The quest and world building are great, and the characters are quite unique and lovable. Some of the strongest aspects to this series is that the characters feel realistically drawn, and none are stereotypically “perfect” people. They have their own insecurities and quirks. I’m loving this series.


Liked it? Loved it? Gotta have more of it? 
The next two books in The Raven Cycle are The Dream Thieves and Blue Lilly, Lilly Blue
Book four, The Raven King, comes out March 29, 2016


Extras:

  • Maggie Stiefvater’s website has extras including music written for/about The Raven Boys, the first chapter, & others.
  • Find The Raven Boys at your local library through worldcat.org
  • Find other recommendations on goodreads.com

About the Author:
Learn more about Maggie Stiefvater and her books on her website.


Citation & Credits
Book cover image: Courtesy of Amazon.com
Kelsey Bogan. 2015. All rights reserved.

(Review-YA) A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

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Maas, Sarah J. A Court of Thorns and Roses. , 2015. Print. ISBN-13: 978-1619634442.
Formats available: hardcover, paperback, ebook, audiobook. Paperback $7.12. Kindle $8.57.

Synopsis:
Feyre is the sole caretaker for her family, and while trying to hunt to save her starving family, she kills a wolf. She was sure he wasn’t Fae (not that she’d mind killing a Fae), but she was wrong. Now a Fae Lord has come to claim vengeance for his slain friend. The Fae Lord offers her a deal, however, a form of mercy. He will abstain from killing Feyre if she agrees to return to his castle in a neighboring magical land, never to return to her family or home again. Soon Feyre learns more about her world and her host, and finds that nothing is as it appears. And she might have the chance for a real family, and true love. But ancient enemies and evil magic are affecting this magical realm, and threatening all those within it. Feyre will need to find a way to stop it, or else lose everything.

My Thoughts:
This is mother excellent contribution by Sarah J. Maas, author of the beloved and popular Throne of Glass series (see my review here). This is a beautiful, heart-pounding fairy-tale retelling, with enough twists to keep it original and unpredictable. The characters are well drawn, and the world is fully developed. Even though I knew which fairy tale it was based on, I still didn’t see quite a bit of the story coming! It is definitely a darker re-telling, but an instant favorite for me. I enjoyed the author’s ideas for the Fae mythologies, and how their powers and world are described. I also really liked how the mortal world and the Fae world are neighbors, so we get a sense of whatever happens in the Fae realm spilling over to affect Feyre’s world, too. It has a sweet love story, but the conclusion is a bit open-ended so that we are not sure what direction, exactly, the next book in the series will take. This is the first in what is sure to be another wildly popular series from Sarah J. Maas. I cannot wait for the next installment, which is as yet untitled.


Liked it? Loved it? Gotta have more of it? 

Check out my Top Ten Fairytale re-telling recommendations

See my recommendation for Throne of Glass

This is the first in a projected series, so there will be more to come!


Extras:

  • Locate ACOTR at your local library through worldcat.com
  • Find recommendations from others who enjoyed ACOTR on goodreads.com
  • The first chapter is available to read free at teenvogue.com

About the Author:
Sarah J. Maas is the bestselling author of The Throne of Glass Series.


Citation & Credits
Book cover image: Courtesy of Amazon.com
Kelsey Bogan. 2015. All rights reserved.